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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and that's starting in half-hour. then rebekah brooks who used to run murdoch's british newspaper empire until last week will answer questions. a limited number of the public are being allowed in. people were lined up at 7:00 a.m. and the line stretched around the block trying to get a seat. the police are still also under allegation of corruption. this story has so many 10 kals, many threads of inquiry even as it involves police involvement. a news of the word reporter was found dead in his home yesterday. sean was the man who originally blew the whistle on his knowledge -- his allegation that former editor of the world andy coulson was very aware of phone hacking and encouraged it. that allegation is something coulson has denied. bill there are when the testimony from mr. murdoch and his son james get underway we'll take you to that room in london, england. jamie: we are just getting word that the fbi is searching homes of the suspected hacker group anonymous. the target said to be in their late teens to early 20s. we are told the hacking group inspired by wikileaks has defaced web sit
of it that the "news of the world" was sacrificed in order to try and protect rebekah brooks' position at news international. but in effect rather than her being -- her departure being announced, "news of the world" was offered up as an alternative to try to deal with the whole thing. do you regret now making that decision? do you regret closing the "news of the world" to try and save rebekah brooks? in hindsight do you wish you'd accepted her resignation to start with, in order that that paper with a fine tradition could probably continue and all of the people who are now out of work could still be in work? >> i regret very much the fate of people who will not be able to find work. the two decisions were totally unrelated. absolutely and totally unrelated. >> so when you came into the u.k. and said your priority was rebekah brooks -- >> i'm not sure i did say that. i was quoted as saying that. i walked outside my flat and had about 20 microphones stuck in my mouth so i'm not sure what i said. >> so you were misquoted? >> i'm not saying that. i just don't remember. >> i'm sorry, mr. chairman.
on the face of it, that the news of the world was sacrificed in order to try and protect rebekah brooks' position at news international >> i advocated at the time that this was a step we should take. this was a paper and a title that had fundamentally violated the trust of its readers, and it's something that was a matter of great regret, real gravity, but under the circumstances, and with respect to the bad things that certain of the things that happened at the "american's "nee world" some years ago, it was the right choice for the paper to cease publication. it is important to note and i want to be clear with the committee on this. that the company is doing everything it can to make sure that journalists and staff at the "news of the world" who had nothing to do with any of these issues, who are completely blameless in any of these things, and many are, you know, really have done tremendous work journalistically, that we find reemployment for them anywhere we k. the company is being as generous as we can under the circumstances. the company is being as thoughtful and compassionate for
of the world" and "the sun" was a part of it. >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quite clearly that the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" lay fairly and squarely with senior management of that paper, which i assume that includes you. is that the case? >> i think -- i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was, that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together -- >> is that mr. murdoch senior? >> sorry, yes, rupert murdoch. yes. >> you wanted to say something else? >> no. sorry. >> when you were advising your staff that the paper was closing, during the private session, i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand on what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom, to explain the decision, clearly and quite rightly, the journalists on the "news of the world" who very honorable journalists who have been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for
to the number three spot in the company. and then there is rebekah brooks, a rupert murdoch protege. she was a top executive before she resigned on friday. she was arrested a couple of days later. let's get straight to london to atika shubert. these witnesses are not under subpoena. they don't have to say a word, do they? >> no. they don't, but it's still a court and can be held in tempt of court for example. even though there is no particular oath here, there is an incredible amount of pressure on them to answer these questions. remember, particularly in the cases of james murdoch and rebekah brooks, they have told lawmakers in previous hearings the this was the end of it. it was a rogue reporter and a private investigator and that was the end of it. clearly, it was not. because it turns out that there are, in fact, thousands of phone mail messages that may have been hacked and now they are back in front of lawmakers again trying to explain why they didn't tell the full story the first time around. >> atika, we have been paying close attention to this since early this morning. you know
am aware of that mr. brooks or mr. heaton had knowledge of. certainly her knowledge of those things has not been clear. i have seen no evidence of impropriety. >> [unintelligible] is that right? >> yes. >> in october of 2010, did you still believe it when you said you would vigorously pursue the truth? >> yes. >> if you were not worrying bend? >> i do not know. >> you acknowledge they you were misled? >> yes. >> are you aware that in march [unintelligible] police? >> i was not aware at the time. it had been amended. >> if you were anyone else in the organization? investigating it at the time? explaining why? >> let me say something. this is not an excuse. this is less than 1% of the company. distinguished people and professionals. >> [unintelligible] what i am trying to establish is paca how your wrongdoing was -- establish is how your wrongdoing was established at the time. were you made aware of [unintelligible] >> [unintelligible] >> what did they do, subsequent to the arrest? >> i told the investigators and eventually they investigated further. >> what did you do to investigate
brooks, they sat there hour after hour, taking the questions in good humor. and that gives them credit to their benefit, that they did go through this process. ultimately, though, tonight, as rupert murdoch did say he doesn't take responsibility for what took place although he will have to be the man that sorts it out. >> are you responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who are responsible? >> the people i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> can you name people? >> i worked with mr. hinton for 52 years and i would trust him with my life. >> what i think is interesting in that exchange, the normal phraseology for people doing that is, i was not to blame, but i take responsibility. the buck stops here. and what we didn't get there was that phraseology or some version thereof. we also finally, wolf, we did get later on in his final statement the hacking was wrong, the payments to the police were wrong, no excuses. >> and there was an incident there at one point where an intruder just showed up with some shaving cream. tell our viewers what happened. >> the pic
of the world." >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" laid fairly and square leon the management of the newspaper, which would include you. is that the case? >> i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said is exactly how it was. it was a collective decision. we all talked together, and mr. murdoch was in with the board at the time, >> yes, rupert murdoch, yes. >> during the private session i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, and clearly and quite rightly the journalists on the "news of the world" who are very honorable and journalists who will been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for a longtime and with great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's decision to close the paper. what i was saying to them is that right now you may not be able to right at this moment understand why we've done it, but i thi
in order to try to protect rebekah brooks' position at news international. in effect, rather than her being -- having her departure being announced, "the news of the world" was offered up as an alternative to try to deal with the whole thing. do you regret now making that decision? do you regret closing "the news of the world" to try and save rebekah brooks? in hindsight, do you wish you accepted her resignation to start with in order that that paper with a fine tradition could probably continue and all of the people who are now out of work could still be in work? >> i regret very much the pain of people that will not be able to find work. the two decisions were totally unrelated, absolutely sxl totally unrelated. >> so when you came into the uk and said your priority for rebekah brooks -- >> i'm not sure i said that. i was quoted as saying that. i had about 20 microphones stuck in my mouth, so i'm not sure what i said. >> you were misquoted? >> i'm not saying that. i just don't remember. >> i think it's important -- i'm sorry, mr. chairman. >> yes. >> mr. davis, it's important to know the
tell the house about the conversations she had about the bskyb bid with mr. murdoch and rebecca brooks? >> all the details of the meetings and explain all of the conversations were appropriate and she could ask the members of her party to be equally transparent. >> does the prime minister join me in hoping that this is the end of the ever increasing rise of misconduct by police officers across the country? >> the police have to have an operation, have to have a relationship with the media, both at the top level to communicate with the police's right to do strategically, and at the operational level to help them with crime. we have to try to make sure they do not have an inappropriate relationship. >> prime minister, have you ever mentioned the word "bskyb" in the presence of rebecca brooks? >> does not raise serious questions about how the previous limit operated that members opposite thought that it a prepared for the prime minister to be brief on police matters? and the e-mails that were released, didn't show how professional his chief of staff is? >> i thank my hon. friend for putti
. >> brown: once the murdochs were done, another central figure in the scandal-- rebekah brooks-- appeared before the committee. she was editor of the now- defunct "news of the world" during the phone hacking, and later became chief executive at the tabloid's british parent firm news international before resigning last week. brooks said she only recently learned that the phone of the young murder victim, milly dowler, had been targeted. >> it seems incredible that you, as the editor, were so unaware of such fundamental issues to do with this investigation. >> i just.. i think... in some ways, just the opposite-- i don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorize, know, sanction, approve of anyone listening to the voice mails of milly dowler in those circumstances. >> brown: brooks was arrested on sunday, and she repeatedly said today there were things she could not discuss due to the ongoing investigation. but she did say she has lasting regrets that everything did not come out long ago. >> of course, i have regrets. i mean, the idea that milly dowler's phone was accessed by someo
his first in command, rebecca brook, was sort of toeing the appropriate line. so whether there's a cover-up there that reaches the highest levels of newscorp or whether it's just the head of a company where there are problems and he's trying to fix them as best he can, i guess we'll -- we may find out. we may not find out. >> some people seem to feel it's really that connection between the rebecca brook, the "news of the world" editor, formerly, and the power that she really had in politics. and david cameron's former assistant also having worked over at the paper. that there just seems to be this coziness that is making people uncomfortable. >> well, i mean, we have the same thing in washington frankly. there's been a lot of coziness over the years. the white house press corps and the -- and government at all levels. i think that's a problem when people live and work and depend on each other for their livelihood. as the press and powerful people do. but, you know, i think murdoch is probably -- may not be the person this hits. i mean, i wonder if there's -- if there's an equiv
of how these men and rebekah brooks allowed or created or allowed to exist a culture that these things could happen and they didn't know about it. >> and it was profound theater to begin with, and as you mentioned, a lot of questions we would still like answered. we'll see how that plays out, but in the middle of this theater, a subplot, if you will. somebody tries to pie rupert murdoch. describe the scene as you recall it and especially i would say a rather feisty defense of mr. murdoch by his wife. >> oh, i mean, well, we're watching from the back. the picture -- all of a sudden, the noise. you see this woman in pink launch herself, going to give somebody a right hook. you then see james murdoch get out the chair like this. now, at first i couldn't tell whether mr. murdoch sr. had been hit. you can then -- in later pictures if you look close, you can see the foam. more than one person suggested that, you know, this could have been a brick, it could have been, you know, nails, it could have been much more serious. you have to bear in mind if it had been anything like that, it wouldn't
from rebekah brooks. if you see it he was trying to get a pie in the face of rupert murdoch. if we can get that shot back up again, you can see in niz left hand a tin -- and see if we can get that shot back up. it looks like he had a tin in his left hand a cream pie that he was going to smash in the face of rupert murdoch during these hearings. the man was quickly taken away in handcuffs. you saw the images of him outside he had something all over his face. wendy dang in the pink jumping up. she is a volleyball player. that looks like a spike. she's known to be a fan of volleyball. anyway, you can see the pie right there trying to get in the face of rupert murdoch. the woman in the gray i'm not sure who she is. she was sitting to the left op of wendy dang. michelle is with us now. is this ovenly some type of protesters coming in to disrupt this and create a true embarrassment to rupert murdoch by delivering a pie in the face? >> we guess. we're basically looking at the exact same pictures that you are. and we're seeing a feed from all over sources here in the uk. it's the same picture
. it's the type of story rebecca brooks would have loved when he edited the sun or "news of the world." now the exchief followed the murdoches into the committee room and matched their contrition. >> it seems like you were so unaware of such fundamental issues -- >> in some ways i think the opposite. i don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorize no sanctioned approval, anyone listening to the voice mails under those circumstances. i don't know anyone who would think it was the right and proper thing to do. >> but someone did it, approved it and covered it up. when rupert murdoch swept out of westminster we were no closer to knowing who. we do know this was a day he did not enjoy. >> well, the impact of rupert murdoch news corporation reaches far beyond the u.k. his company was born in australia in 1952 as news limited which today is about 70% of australian numerous. we're joined by a professor at the university of sydney. he joins me now. thank you for joining us. what did you make of the hearings? >> it was like late-night football here. i thought the statement i know n
was a part of it. >> thank you. >> jim sheridan. >> miss brooks. rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quitely that the responsibility for the closure of news of the world fell fairly and swearly on senior management which i assume would include you, is that the case? >> i think i missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was. that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together. >> murdoch senior? >> yes, rupert murdoch. >> you were going to say something snels. >> no. >> when you were advising your staff the paper was closing during the private session. i think you said something like there was more to come. youl you like to expand? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, clearly and and quite rightly the journalists on the news of the world who very honorable journalists who have been putting out the newspaper under the scrutiny for a long time and with great exclusives and great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's de
hacking scandal. he and his son james and former news corp. executive rebekah brooks were grilled today. the elder murdoch apologizing but refusing to take the rap. >> do you feel that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> nope. >> you're not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run it. and then maybe the people they trusted. >> no apology and no stepping down. >> have you considered resigning? >> >> no. >> why not? >> because i feel that people i trusted, not saying who, i don't know what level. have let me down. and i think they have behaved disgracefully and betrayed the company and me. and it's for them to pay. i think that frankly i'm the best person to clean this up. >> and speaking of cleaning up, the proceedings were interrupted briefly when a protestor deliver a shaving cream pie. take a look at this. keep your eye on the lower left-hand corner of your screen. it happens pretty quickly. >> oh! >> here it is quickly again in slow motion. here comes the pie. and that pink blur that you see over there is rupert murdoch's wife wendy wh
than 100"÷"÷ million homes."÷"÷ created by cable, provided as a÷ public service."÷"÷ >>> rebecca brooks, the former"÷ chief executive of news"÷"÷ international, testified earlie÷ this week before a house of"÷"÷ commons committee. she"÷"÷ was questioned on her knowledge of phone hacking at"÷÷ "news of the world," alleged"÷"÷ payments made to police officers and to celebrity victims of"÷"÷ hacking. she was"÷"÷ also asked about"÷"÷ tampering with the voicemail of a teenage murder victim. >> we've now come to the second part of our session. i'd like to welcome ms. be rebecca brooks, recent chief executive officer at news international, and i'd like to thank you for your willingness to come before the committee. we are very much aware there is an ongoing police investigation which could lead to further proceedings, and we will bear that in mind, but we also appreciate your statement when you resigned from the company that you wanted to be as helpful as possible to various inquiries that are underway. could i just start then. news international issued a statement when you we
his son and rebekah brooks all apologizing for "the news of the world"'s behavior. >> this is the most humble day of my career. the same story is not enough. things must be put right. no excuses. . it's a matter of great regret of mine, my father's and everyone at news corporation, and these are standards, these actions do not live up to the standards that our company aspires to. it's our determination to both put things right. make sure these things don't happen again. >> i would like to add my own personal appaologies and the apologies that james and rupert murdoch made today. clearly, what happened at "the news of the world" and certainly the allegations of voice intercepts, is pretty horrific and abhorrent. >> as i said, robert, it's an apology without a confession. what does that mean? >> we've seen it in the states here so many times, mistake was made. we know exactly the way that the grammar that's used. here we have somewhat of an about the je object but no specificity to an apology. i didn't hear one. >> this is a multilevel scandal. this doesn't just involve news corporation.
like you've never seen them before. we talked about charlie sheen's ex brooke mueller. she's had a lot of struggles with drugs and alcohol. she went to rehab then had a relapse. she was going to mexico to get this special drug ibogaine. apparently she couldn't get on the plane, though, when she went to go to the mexican rehab because she couldn't find her passport. so that is to bebeontinued. they're trying to get her an emergency passport so she can get to that rehab. >> lots of rumors there about katy perry and russell brand breaking up. apparently katy went on to twitter and said, do not believe it, we're just fine, and the marriage apparently is solid. she went out there and wrote what you see there on your screen. privacy is our luxury, we don't need to flaunt our relationship. basically is what she said. >>> here are somome stories to watch today on abc news. the military psychiatrist charged in the 2009 ft. hood shootings is due in court this afternoon for arraignment. nidal malik hasan is accused of killing 13 people. >>> american airlines is expected to announce it's ordering
. >> elizabeth murdoch has denied reports she blamed her brother james aura beck cag brooks for the damage the scandal has done to her father's company. she once started her own independent tv firm only to be bought by her father for nearly $650 million. >> this is a man who cares so much about his legacy, he once said to me, all i want is for my kids to be decent people. >> they love their father, but keep an eye on replacing him when that day comes. >> james very much very much wanted it. they all wanted it. there was the period when elizabeth wanted -- elizabeth was the heir and that didn't work out. and then lackland and james. so actually this rather continues the pattern. >> keeping it all in the family. rupert murdoch told questioners about his late father buying a small newspaper, rooting out scandals. >> which i remain very, very proud of. >> i think students of history are well aware of your family business. >> i would love to see my sons and daughters follow if they're interested. >> a hint from the father that the children may be less interested now that the company is embroile
of pieces of that and told me he became a suspect. >> you were told rebecca brooks would be arrested? >> yes. >> how long before? >> 80 ten days? >> two days? >> i can't remember. but that is entirely proper. >> can we stick to resignations? [talking over each other] [inaudible] >> i was simply trying to ensure that the exchanges between the employment of mr. coulson, why would i want to risk anyone being accused of any compromise? i would not suggest for one moment -- why would i risk that compromise? my understanding is the advice from the senior official in number 10 and it is very sensible not to compromise people or leave a suggestion of compromise? >> it is not a question of keeping it secret from the home secretary. as commissioner of the metropolitan police, very substantial salary, you have great responsibilities and your predecessors had to tell the prime minister a lot of unpleasant things for many years. why is it this was a matter that you felt was something that you couldn't disclose? >> we were it is negative. let me remind you, wallace becoming a name in regards to packing, f
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)